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DelhiWood showcases 450 exhibitors

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:40

One of South Asia’ largest international trade shows for furniture production technologies, tools, furniture accessories and raw materials is DelhiWood, this year will be the fourth show. Source: Wood and Panel Europe This will be the region’s largest B2B get-together when it gets underway at the India Expo Centre and Mart in Greater Noida, near New Delhi from 4-7 February. Like its predecessors, DelhiWood 2015 will feature more than 450 exhibitors from over 20 countries, showcasing the latest in technology, hardware, software, tooling and accessories. It includes live demonstrations of log peelers, panel saws, hot presses, edge banders and other machinery, materials and software. The show will be of special importance to furniture and particle board makers, machinery and tool manufacturers and consumers, saw millers and timber suppliers, architects and interior designers, forestry officials and other woodworking professionals in North and North-East India. DelhiWood 2015 is expected to attract more than 15,000 business visitors. It will give top suppliers of raw material, manufacturers of woodworking machinery, tools and consumables, and retailers of fittings and accessories an opportunity to connect with woodworking professionals from North, Central, East and North East India and neighbouring countries like Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar and Bhutan.

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Categories: , Forest

DelhiWood showcases 450 exhibitors

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:40

One of South Asia’ largest international trade shows for furniture production technologies, tools, furniture accessories and raw materials is DelhiWood, this year will be the fourth show. Source: Wood and Panel Europe This will be the region’s largest B2B get-together when it gets underway at the India Expo Centre and Mart in Greater Noida, near New Delhi from 4-7 February. Like its predecessors, DelhiWood 2015 will feature more than 450 exhibitors from over 20 countries, showcasing the latest in technology, hardware, software, tooling and accessories. It includes live demonstrations of log peelers, panel saws, hot presses, edge banders and other machinery, materials and software. The show will be of special importance to furniture and particle board makers, machinery and tool manufacturers and consumers, saw millers and timber suppliers, architects and interior designers, forestry officials and other woodworking professionals in North and North-East India. DelhiWood 2015 is expected to attract more than 15,000 business visitors. It will give top suppliers of raw material, manufacturers of woodworking machinery, tools and consumables, and retailers of fittings and accessories an opportunity to connect with woodworking professionals from North, Central, East and North East India and neighbouring countries like Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar and Bhutan.

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Categories: Europe

PAPTAC to honour FPInnovations’ CEO

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:38

Pierre Lapointe, FPInnovations’ president and CEO, will be presented the John S Bates Memorial Gold Medal by the Pulp and Paper Technical Association of Canada (PAPTAC) on 5 February, 2015 at Paperweek. Source: Timberbiz Paperweek is PAPTAC’s global pulp and paper industry event held in Montreal, Canada. The Bates Medal is PAPTAC’s most prestigious award given to a member of the association in recognition of their great contribution to the science and technology of the pulp and paper industry. It was instituted in 1989 to recognize the organization’s founder and first chairman, John S Bates. Trained as a geologist and geophysicist, Lapointe has been the president and CEO of FPInnovations since December 2008. Under his leadership, FPInnovations has positioned itself as a world-leading R&D institute that specializes in the creation of scientific solutions in support of the Canadian forest sector’s global competitiveness. FPInnovations’ scientific research has supported the forest industry with landmark projects and game-changing technologies, such as building the world’s first nanocrystalline cellulose demonstration plant in partnership with Domtar, and the world’s first cellulose filament demonstration plant in collaboration with Kruger. Before joining FPInnovations, Lapointe headed l’Institut national dela recherche scientifique and managed its integration with l’Institut Armand-Frappier. He began his career at Natural Resources Canada, where he worked in research and management with various research teams. He was subsequently appointed director general of the Geological Survey of Canada Information and Services Branch, where he created the Québec Geoscience Center as part of a unique partnership between a university institute and a government agency. “We are delighted that Pierre has been recognized for his exceptional leadership in science and technology in the pulp and paper field. On behalf of the Board, I offer my warmest congratulations for this well-deserved honour,” said Mark Feldinger, chairman of the Board of FPInnovations, and Canfor’s senior vice president.

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Categories: Forest

PAPTAC to honour FPInnovations’ CEO

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:38

Pierre Lapointe, FPInnovations’ president and CEO, will be presented the John S Bates Memorial Gold Medal by the Pulp and Paper Technical Association of Canada (PAPTAC) on 5 February, 2015 at Paperweek. Source: Timberbiz Paperweek is PAPTAC’s global pulp and paper industry event held in Montreal, Canada. The Bates Medal is PAPTAC’s most prestigious award given to a member of the association in recognition of their great contribution to the science and technology of the pulp and paper industry. It was instituted in 1989 to recognize the organization’s founder and first chairman, John S Bates. Trained as a geologist and geophysicist, Lapointe has been the president and CEO of FPInnovations since December 2008. Under his leadership, FPInnovations has positioned itself as a world-leading R&D institute that specializes in the creation of scientific solutions in support of the Canadian forest sector’s global competitiveness. FPInnovations’ scientific research has supported the forest industry with landmark projects and game-changing technologies, such as building the world’s first nanocrystalline cellulose demonstration plant in partnership with Domtar, and the world’s first cellulose filament demonstration plant in collaboration with Kruger. Before joining FPInnovations, Lapointe headed l’Institut national dela recherche scientifique and managed its integration with l’Institut Armand-Frappier. He began his career at Natural Resources Canada, where he worked in research and management with various research teams. He was subsequently appointed director general of the Geological Survey of Canada Information and Services Branch, where he created the Québec Geoscience Center as part of a unique partnership between a university institute and a government agency. “We are delighted that Pierre has been recognized for his exceptional leadership in science and technology in the pulp and paper field. On behalf of the Board, I offer my warmest congratulations for this well-deserved honour,” said Mark Feldinger, chairman of the Board of FPInnovations, and Canfor’s senior vice president.

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Categories: , Europe

Peeling back Stora Enso’s investment

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:37

Stora Enso is investing EUR 43 million in a new production line for wooden building elements located in Varkaus, Finland. Sources: Timberbiz, Global News Wire The investment is based on peeling technology, which will further enhance Stora Enso’s position as a global provider of high quality engineered wooden elements. The new products complement the existing product portfolio. Production is scheduled to begin in the second quarter of 2016. The estimated yearly capacity of the production line will be around 100 000 m3. The investment is expected to generate annual sales of EUR 50 million when run at full capacity and over time significantly exceed Stora Enso’s ROCE target of 13%. “This investment is part of Stora Enso’s transformation to a customer-focused renewable materials company. With this investment we will be able to meet growing urban construction needs, serve new geographic areas and markets and offer our customers a wider range of wood product solutions,” said Jari Suominen, EVP head of Stora Enso’s wood products. In Varkaus, Stora Enso can take advantage of and make best use of the premises available, an industrial infrastructure for efficient logistics, the local supply of raw material to optimise wood sourcing and highly competent workforce. The operational model at the Varkaus sawmill will be reviewed in connection with the production start-up. The estimated total employment impact for the Varkaus region is 150 FTEs.

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Categories: , Forest

Peeling back Stora Enso’s investment

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:37

Stora Enso is investing EUR 43 million in a new production line for wooden building elements located in Varkaus, Finland. Sources: Timberbiz, Global News Wire The investment is based on peeling technology, which will further enhance Stora Enso’s position as a global provider of high quality engineered wooden elements. The new products complement the existing product portfolio. Production is scheduled to begin in the second quarter of 2016. The estimated yearly capacity of the production line will be around 100 000 m3. The investment is expected to generate annual sales of EUR 50 million when run at full capacity and over time significantly exceed Stora Enso’s ROCE target of 13%. “This investment is part of Stora Enso’s transformation to a customer-focused renewable materials company. With this investment we will be able to meet growing urban construction needs, serve new geographic areas and markets and offer our customers a wider range of wood product solutions,” said Jari Suominen, EVP head of Stora Enso’s wood products. In Varkaus, Stora Enso can take advantage of and make best use of the premises available, an industrial infrastructure for efficient logistics, the local supply of raw material to optimise wood sourcing and highly competent workforce. The operational model at the Varkaus sawmill will be reviewed in connection with the production start-up. The estimated total employment impact for the Varkaus region is 150 FTEs.

The post Peeling back Stora Enso’s investment appeared first on Timberbiz.

Categories: Europe

Australia’s $22m to monitor forests

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:27

Mr Turnbull announced that Australia would participate in a system of satellite tracking stations to help monitor forest cover in the Asia-Pacific region. Sources: AAP, SBS News Environment Minister Turnbull has said that technology will help Australia targeting illegal logging in the Asia-Pacific region. The surveillance is aimed at helping countries track illegal logging. Foreign Affairs Minister Alexander Downer and Mr Turnbull announced that Australia would give $10 million to Indonesia and contribute almost $12 million to a World Bank program as part of the federal government’s $200 million global climate initiative. They said $10 million would go to Indonesia and $11.7 million to the World Bank’s new global Forest Alliance to help fund sustainable forest management and international efforts to reduce global deforestation. The funding is being provided from the federal government’s $200 million Global Initiative on Forests and Climate Change. Mr Turnbull said the use of technology in the fight against deforestation would be on the agenda at a meeting of about 70 countries in Sydney this week. “We’re going to need technology, we’re going to need money, we’re going to need goodwill and a lot of cooperation,” Mr Turnbull told ABC Radio. “Some of the largest deforesters will be there in the sense that countries like Indonesia and Brazil, the countries of big tropical forests where most of the deforestation is occurring, are going to be present. “There’s no point funding the protection of a forest in one valley if the forest in the adjoining valley is all clearfelled.” The report said countries would be asked to join the scheme so the results could be fed into an international database. Greenpeace spokesman Steven Campbell said a similar program was already up and running and funds should be directed elsewhere. “One of the biggest problems with deforestation in our region in places such as Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, is the level of corruption and poor governance in the forest,” he said. “The best thing that the government can do is to stop the importation of illegal timber in Australia, because we import about $400 million worth of illegal timber every year.”  

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Categories: Forest

Australia’s $22m to monitor forests

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:27

Mr Turnbull announced that Australia would participate in a system of satellite tracking stations to help monitor forest cover in the Asia-Pacific region. Sources: AAP, SBS News Environment Minister Turnbull has said that technology will help Australia targeting illegal logging in the Asia-Pacific region. The surveillance is aimed at helping countries track illegal logging. Foreign Affairs Minister Alexander Downer and Mr Turnbull announced that Australia would give $10 million to Indonesia and contribute almost $12 million to a World Bank program as part of the federal government’s $200 million global climate initiative. They said $10 million would go to Indonesia and $11.7 million to the World Bank’s new global Forest Alliance to help fund sustainable forest management and international efforts to reduce global deforestation. The funding is being provided from the federal government’s $200 million Global Initiative on Forests and Climate Change. Mr Turnbull said the use of technology in the fight against deforestation would be on the agenda at a meeting of about 70 countries in Sydney this week. “We’re going to need technology, we’re going to need money, we’re going to need goodwill and a lot of cooperation,” Mr Turnbull told ABC Radio. “Some of the largest deforesters will be there in the sense that countries like Indonesia and Brazil, the countries of big tropical forests where most of the deforestation is occurring, are going to be present. “There’s no point funding the protection of a forest in one valley if the forest in the adjoining valley is all clearfelled.” The report said countries would be asked to join the scheme so the results could be fed into an international database. Greenpeace spokesman Steven Campbell said a similar program was already up and running and funds should be directed elsewhere. “One of the biggest problems with deforestation in our region in places such as Indonesia and Papua New Guinea, is the level of corruption and poor governance in the forest,” he said. “The best thing that the government can do is to stop the importation of illegal timber in Australia, because we import about $400 million worth of illegal timber every year.”  

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Categories: , Europe

Open door for Kiwi prefab housing

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:25

New Zealand’s first factory turning out finished houses has opened in Wellington, aiming to produce up to 500 places annually. Source: The Nortern Star Sean Murrie, Matrix Homes chief executive and director said Finance Minister Bill English opened the 8000 square metre Trentham factory in the former General Motors assembly plant. “People are building components of houses, then assembling them on the site. But the whole thing here is we’re turning fully finished houses with code compliance certificates,” Mr Murrie said. Grant Florence, chief executive of Certified Builders said more people were looking at prefabricated houses to address the housing shortage. “This is not new. Prefabrication of houses has been around a long, long time,” Florence said. “I have concerns about whether the market is big enough to sustain these sorts of operations. “They have to overcome some consumer negatives around the prefab concept because people relate it to cheap and they relate it to prefabs at schools.” In December it was announced that Auckland’s first house-building factory was being planned for Pokeno and could produce components for two-and-a-half houses a day. Mike Greer, founder and chief of house building business Mike Greer Homes, said then that he and a joint venture partner planned to develop a $16 million high-volume residential panels factory at Pokeno because he thought that was the best place to supply Auckland, Tauranga and Hamilton. The factory could eventually make components for 1250 houses a year, Mr Greer said. “You stick timber in one end and out pops a house,” said Mr Greer said. His business has formed Concision, a joint venture with construction business Spanbuild, to develop the new NZ$14 million Rolleston factory south of Christchurch in the iZone industrial park where Weinmann specialist German machinery is installed for the production line house panel manufacturer. Matrix houses come in an M1 module with a single bedroom and a larger M2 two-bedroom module and have a simple mono-pitch roof with a big square wall at one end. Both modules exist as standalone homes, or can be combined in a host of different configurations. “Both modules can fit on a truck or book a ticket on the Cook Strait Ferry,” the business said. Module costs are NZ $89,000 for a 51sq m, one bedroom, or NZ$99,000 for a 70sq m, two bedrooms or NZ$195,000 for a 140sq m, 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom house. The transport costs are NZ$10,000 in Wellington or NZ$20,000 in Auckland.

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Categories: , Forest

Open door for Kiwi prefab housing

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:25

New Zealand’s first factory turning out finished houses has opened in Wellington, aiming to produce up to 500 places annually. Source: The Nortern Star Sean Murrie, Matrix Homes chief executive and director said Finance Minister Bill English opened the 8000 square metre Trentham factory in the former General Motors assembly plant. “People are building components of houses, then assembling them on the site. But the whole thing here is we’re turning fully finished houses with code compliance certificates,” Mr Murrie said. Grant Florence, chief executive of Certified Builders said more people were looking at prefabricated houses to address the housing shortage. “This is not new. Prefabrication of houses has been around a long, long time,” Florence said. “I have concerns about whether the market is big enough to sustain these sorts of operations. “They have to overcome some consumer negatives around the prefab concept because people relate it to cheap and they relate it to prefabs at schools.” In December it was announced that Auckland’s first house-building factory was being planned for Pokeno and could produce components for two-and-a-half houses a day. Mike Greer, founder and chief of house building business Mike Greer Homes, said then that he and a joint venture partner planned to develop a $16 million high-volume residential panels factory at Pokeno because he thought that was the best place to supply Auckland, Tauranga and Hamilton. The factory could eventually make components for 1250 houses a year, Mr Greer said. “You stick timber in one end and out pops a house,” said Mr Greer said. His business has formed Concision, a joint venture with construction business Spanbuild, to develop the new NZ$14 million Rolleston factory south of Christchurch in the iZone industrial park where Weinmann specialist German machinery is installed for the production line house panel manufacturer. Matrix houses come in an M1 module with a single bedroom and a larger M2 two-bedroom module and have a simple mono-pitch roof with a big square wall at one end. Both modules exist as standalone homes, or can be combined in a host of different configurations. “Both modules can fit on a truck or book a ticket on the Cook Strait Ferry,” the business said. Module costs are NZ $89,000 for a 51sq m, one bedroom, or NZ$99,000 for a 70sq m, two bedrooms or NZ$195,000 for a 140sq m, 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom house. The transport costs are NZ$10,000 in Wellington or NZ$20,000 in Auckland.

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Categories: Europe

Forestry death inquests in NZ

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:23

The family of a Rotorua man killed in a forestry accident found out about his death by text message, an inquest has been told. Source: Radio New Zealand Robert Epapara, 23, died after he was crushed by a tree in the Waione Forest, near Rotorua, in March 2013. His stepfather, Wiremu Edmonds, who is a forest safety advocate, has told the Coroners Court that when Mr Epapara was killed the rumour about his death was already on social networking sites before the family found out. “It was believed that the partner of one of Robert’s work friends sent a text message to the girlfriend who in turn sent a text to Robert’s partner to tell her Robert had been killed,” said Mr Edmonds. “It wasn’t until two hours later police arrived at our home to confirm the information. “It concerns me that families are being exposed to more hurt, anger and grief when receiving information from others outside or off the worksite.” Mr Edmonds told Coroner Wallace Bain the interaction the family had with WorkSafe and the inspector investigating his stepson’s death was unsatisfactory. He said they had no contact from the WorkSafe inspector investigating the death for nearly a year and that lack of communication increased the burden on an already difficult grieving process. Mr Edmonds wanted to see procedures about communication put into place after a forestry death and he also raised the issue of workloads on forestry inspectors. “I am concerned the workload is far too great for the small number of inspectors dedicated to the forestry industry,” he said. A spokesperson for WorkSafe said it would be inappropriate for it to comment during the inquest process. “But WorkSafe New Zealand acknowledges that this is a distressing issue for Robert Epapara’s family. “Since it was established in December 2013, WorkSafe has had a major focus on forest safety, which has included more on-site visits and greater support to the sector to help it lift safety standards.” The inquest started with evidence from two witnesses who saw the tree fall, and the foreman who felled the tree, which killed Mr Epapara, Major Nelson. The Coroner has been told there were safety breaches in the forest that day, including vague communication between workers and no morning safety meeting. In a statement read to the Coroner’s Court, Mr Nelson said Mr Epapara was his friend and colleague. Mr Nelson felled the tree after asking a colleague via radio if Mr Epapara could be seen. He thought he had been given the all clear to cut the tree but the two witnesses gave the court conflicting accounts of whether or not they told Mr Nelson they could see Mr Epapara. Mr Nelson was fined $50,000 last year for failing to take all practical steps to ensure worker safety. The company he part owns, Complete Logging, was ordered to pay $135,000 in a fine and reparation. This is the fifth of eight inquests being held into deaths of forestry workers. The sixth inquest is into the death of David McMurtrie who was killed in a forestry accident near Rotorua, his family has filed court action after a judge tried to stop them taking a private prosecution. David McMurtrie, 49, died almost two years ago when a tree he was felling landed on him in Houpoto Forest in the Bay of Plenty. His family has asked for a judicial review of a judge’s decision that has meant that they cannot try to prosecute the company Mr McMurtrie worked for, Maunga Waru Logging. President of the Council of Trade Unions, Helen Kelly, said the judge ruled that the family could not act because they had left it too long and the fact they did not know they could prosecute is not an excuse. She said the family thought Worksafe might have intended to prosecute the company, so they did not go ahead. “This family feels that there really should have been a prosecution in relation to Dave’s death. “And the circumstances in which he was working were unsafe and they want justice, like any family would.” Ms Kelly said they have yet to get a date for the hearing. The inquest into Mr McMurtrie’s death was supposed have started at the Rotorua Coroners Court, but has been put back until April by the Coroner. Mr McMurtrie’s death is one of eight being examined by Coroner Wallace Bain. Coroner Bain also plans to hear evidence from expert witnesses before delivering his findings into all eight deaths.

The post Forestry death inquests in NZ appeared first on Timberbiz.

Categories: Forest

Forestry death inquests in NZ

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:23

The family of a Rotorua man killed in a forestry accident found out about his death by text message, an inquest has been told. Source: Radio New Zealand Robert Epapara, 23, died after he was crushed by a tree in the Waione Forest, near Rotorua, in March 2013. His stepfather, Wiremu Edmonds, who is a forest safety advocate, has told the Coroners Court that when Mr Epapara was killed the rumour about his death was already on social networking sites before the family found out. “It was believed that the partner of one of Robert’s work friends sent a text message to the girlfriend who in turn sent a text to Robert’s partner to tell her Robert had been killed,” said Mr Edmonds. “It wasn’t until two hours later police arrived at our home to confirm the information. “It concerns me that families are being exposed to more hurt, anger and grief when receiving information from others outside or off the worksite.” Mr Edmonds told Coroner Wallace Bain the interaction the family had with WorkSafe and the inspector investigating his stepson’s death was unsatisfactory. He said they had no contact from the WorkSafe inspector investigating the death for nearly a year and that lack of communication increased the burden on an already difficult grieving process. Mr Edmonds wanted to see procedures about communication put into place after a forestry death and he also raised the issue of workloads on forestry inspectors. “I am concerned the workload is far too great for the small number of inspectors dedicated to the forestry industry,” he said. A spokesperson for WorkSafe said it would be inappropriate for it to comment during the inquest process. “But WorkSafe New Zealand acknowledges that this is a distressing issue for Robert Epapara’s family. “Since it was established in December 2013, WorkSafe has had a major focus on forest safety, which has included more on-site visits and greater support to the sector to help it lift safety standards.” The inquest started with evidence from two witnesses who saw the tree fall, and the foreman who felled the tree, which killed Mr Epapara, Major Nelson. The Coroner has been told there were safety breaches in the forest that day, including vague communication between workers and no morning safety meeting. In a statement read to the Coroner’s Court, Mr Nelson said Mr Epapara was his friend and colleague. Mr Nelson felled the tree after asking a colleague via radio if Mr Epapara could be seen. He thought he had been given the all clear to cut the tree but the two witnesses gave the court conflicting accounts of whether or not they told Mr Nelson they could see Mr Epapara. Mr Nelson was fined $50,000 last year for failing to take all practical steps to ensure worker safety. The company he part owns, Complete Logging, was ordered to pay $135,000 in a fine and reparation. This is the fifth of eight inquests being held into deaths of forestry workers. The sixth inquest is into the death of David McMurtrie who was killed in a forestry accident near Rotorua, his family has filed court action after a judge tried to stop them taking a private prosecution. David McMurtrie, 49, died almost two years ago when a tree he was felling landed on him in Houpoto Forest in the Bay of Plenty. His family has asked for a judicial review of a judge’s decision that has meant that they cannot try to prosecute the company Mr McMurtrie worked for, Maunga Waru Logging. President of the Council of Trade Unions, Helen Kelly, said the judge ruled that the family could not act because they had left it too long and the fact they did not know they could prosecute is not an excuse. She said the family thought Worksafe might have intended to prosecute the company, so they did not go ahead. “This family feels that there really should have been a prosecution in relation to Dave’s death. “And the circumstances in which he was working were unsafe and they want justice, like any family would.” Ms Kelly said they have yet to get a date for the hearing. The inquest into Mr McMurtrie’s death was supposed have started at the Rotorua Coroners Court, but has been put back until April by the Coroner. Mr McMurtrie’s death is one of eight being examined by Coroner Wallace Bain. Coroner Bain also plans to hear evidence from expert witnesses before delivering his findings into all eight deaths.

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Categories: , Europe

Structural changes to TDA

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:21

The Timber Development Association (TDA) has welcomed a new staff member, Fred Moshiri, a structural engineer with a background in timber structural design in Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Source: Timberbiz “TDA’s workload has grown rapidly recently as massive timbers are increasingly being specified and used to build the structures of Australian apartments as well as office buildings and a range of other non-residential buildings,” said Andrew Dunn, CEO of TDA. “Fred’s expertise will be an invaluable addition to TDA’s services to the timber industry and the Australian building design and construction industry.” Mr Moshiri will also be helping with organisation and delivery of technical seminars to structural engineers via the WoodSolutions program throughout New South Wales, ACT and South Australia. He has a civil engineering degree as well as a Masters degree in timber engineering from the Linnaeus University, Sweden. Mr Moshiri has more than five years of experience in design and construction management of projects with exposure to analysis, design and project planning of reinforced concrete, steel and timber buildings. In 2010, he migrated to Australia to undertake a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney, under the supervision of internationally recognised timber engineer Professor Keith Crews. His PhD, funded by the Structural Timber Innovation Company, focused on the structural behaviour of timber concrete composite connections and floors to enable timber composite floor to compete more effectively in the building and construction market. At UTS he was involved in research on timber, timber-concrete composites and engineering education. He is the author of more than 12 technical journals and conference papers in the fields of structural engineering and engineering education and is a reviewer for the Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture in the United States. He is a member of Engineers Australia and a member of American Society of Civil Engineers and American Concrete Institution Committee 335, composite structure.

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Categories: , Forest

Structural changes to TDA

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:21

The Timber Development Association (TDA) has welcomed a new staff member, Fred Moshiri, a structural engineer with a background in timber structural design in Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Source: Timberbiz “TDA’s workload has grown rapidly recently as massive timbers are increasingly being specified and used to build the structures of Australian apartments as well as office buildings and a range of other non-residential buildings,” said Andrew Dunn, CEO of TDA. “Fred’s expertise will be an invaluable addition to TDA’s services to the timber industry and the Australian building design and construction industry.” Mr Moshiri will also be helping with organisation and delivery of technical seminars to structural engineers via the WoodSolutions program throughout New South Wales, ACT and South Australia. He has a civil engineering degree as well as a Masters degree in timber engineering from the Linnaeus University, Sweden. Mr Moshiri has more than five years of experience in design and construction management of projects with exposure to analysis, design and project planning of reinforced concrete, steel and timber buildings. In 2010, he migrated to Australia to undertake a PhD at the University of Technology, Sydney, under the supervision of internationally recognised timber engineer Professor Keith Crews. His PhD, funded by the Structural Timber Innovation Company, focused on the structural behaviour of timber concrete composite connections and floors to enable timber composite floor to compete more effectively in the building and construction market. At UTS he was involved in research on timber, timber-concrete composites and engineering education. He is the author of more than 12 technical journals and conference papers in the fields of structural engineering and engineering education and is a reviewer for the Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture in the United States. He is a member of Engineers Australia and a member of American Society of Civil Engineers and American Concrete Institution Committee 335, composite structure.

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Categories: Europe

New board member represents Queensland’s Cypress

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:19

Garrie James, managing director, Inglewood Cypress Sawmill, has been appointed to Timber Queensland Board of Directors to represent Queensland’s cypress sector. Source: Timberbiz Timber Queensland’s chair Sean Gribble said he welcomed the appointment and the broad expertise Garrie would bring to the board. “Garrie James is also the proprietor of a sizeable Melbourne Timber Merchant – Outdoor Timber; President of Timber Preservers Association of Australia (TPAA) and President of the Melbourne Hoo – Hoo Club,” said Mr Gribble. “The breadth of his industry knowledge will be of considerable value and assist TQ’s decision making across all facets of the business”

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Categories: Forest

New board member represents Queensland’s Cypress

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:19

Garrie James, managing director, Inglewood Cypress Sawmill, has been appointed to Timber Queensland Board of Directors to represent Queensland’s cypress sector. Source: Timberbiz Timber Queensland’s chair Sean Gribble said he welcomed the appointment and the broad expertise Garrie would bring to the board. “Garrie James is also the proprietor of a sizeable Melbourne Timber Merchant – Outdoor Timber; President of Timber Preservers Association of Australia (TPAA) and President of the Melbourne Hoo – Hoo Club,” said Mr Gribble. “The breadth of his industry knowledge will be of considerable value and assist TQ’s decision making across all facets of the business”

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Categories: , Europe

Designed for timber awards

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:16

The 2015 Australian Timber Design Awards will be open for entries on 9 February. The awards are a national competition to promote and encourage outstanding timber design in the built environment professions. Source: Timberbiz Now in their 16th year, the awards are distinguished by a heritage of stunning projects. The Australian Timber Design Awards are open to builders, designers, architects, engineers and landscape architects: to anyone involved in the design or building of structures that feature timber. The broad range of entry categories have been tweaked this year to better cover the diversity of timber application and product use. This includes new categories, landscaping, alterations and additions. The price for entry has been substantially reduced to $195 per entry and $295 for a second entry. For further information on conditions, categories, registration and previous winners, visit the awards website at www.timberawards.com.au or contact Jane Letteri – awards coordinator at jane.l@tdansw.asn.au or call 02 8424 3702.  

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Categories: , Forest

Designed for timber awards

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:16

The 2015 Australian Timber Design Awards will be open for entries on 9 February. The awards are a national competition to promote and encourage outstanding timber design in the built environment professions. Source: Timberbiz Now in their 16th year, the awards are distinguished by a heritage of stunning projects. The Australian Timber Design Awards are open to builders, designers, architects, engineers and landscape architects: to anyone involved in the design or building of structures that feature timber. The broad range of entry categories have been tweaked this year to better cover the diversity of timber application and product use. This includes new categories, landscaping, alterations and additions. The price for entry has been substantially reduced to $195 per entry and $295 for a second entry. For further information on conditions, categories, registration and previous winners, visit the awards website at www.timberawards.com.au or contact Jane Letteri – awards coordinator at jane.l@tdansw.asn.au or call 02 8424 3702.  

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Categories: Europe

RBA cuts rates to boost economic activity

Global Forest Information Service - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:14

  The Reserve Bank Board voted to lower the Official Cash Rate for the first time since August 2013. Source: Timberbix “With Australia’s inflation pulse at its slowest in several years but domestic demand remaining weak, the RBA Board have cut rates to provide an opportunity for the economy to grow at a stronger rate than might otherwise have occurred,” said Housing Industry Association (HIA) Chief Economist, Harley Dale. “New residential construction has been the star performer of the Australian economy in recent years, generating considerable employment along the way, but wider domestic consumption and investment has failed to catch the ride. “A further ‘touch down’ to interest rates will help maintain very healthy levels of new home building while hopefully broadening the base of Australia’s economic growth. “The Reserve Bank has also indicated that the Australian dollar needs to fall further and it sees another interest rate cut as helping to achieve that outcome. “The RBA today hinted at a further elevation in the use of macro prudential tools to restrict mortgage lending in a targeted manner. “Care needs to be taken that any such action does not have adverse impacts on confidence and activity in the broader residential market.”

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Categories: Forest

RBA cuts rates to boost economic activity

Metla Finland - Thu, 2015-02-05 03:14

  The Reserve Bank Board voted to lower the Official Cash Rate for the first time since August 2013. Source: Timberbix “With Australia’s inflation pulse at its slowest in several years but domestic demand remaining weak, the RBA Board have cut rates to provide an opportunity for the economy to grow at a stronger rate than might otherwise have occurred,” said Housing Industry Association (HIA) Chief Economist, Harley Dale. “New residential construction has been the star performer of the Australian economy in recent years, generating considerable employment along the way, but wider domestic consumption and investment has failed to catch the ride. “A further ‘touch down’ to interest rates will help maintain very healthy levels of new home building while hopefully broadening the base of Australia’s economic growth. “The Reserve Bank has also indicated that the Australian dollar needs to fall further and it sees another interest rate cut as helping to achieve that outcome. “The RBA today hinted at a further elevation in the use of macro prudential tools to restrict mortgage lending in a targeted manner. “Care needs to be taken that any such action does not have adverse impacts on confidence and activity in the broader residential market.”

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Categories: , Europe